Conny Blom

Conny Blom

 

Instruction Piece - An Invocation
Folder, instruction on A4 paper, audio on CD, and drawing

Executed as a performance by curator Martin Schibli at Ronneby Kulturcentrum (konsthallen), Ronneby, Sweden, November 2014. Photos of the performance by Merzedes Šturm-Lie.

The work is an instruction piece in the tradition of conceptual art. If executed an actual invocation is performed. Said invocation is derived from Demonolatry practices, but altered as to provide an open invitation for the demon Beleth to join whomever executes the invocation in whatever space the invocation is performed. The means of controlling the demon has been excluded, as has the ending where the practitioner would normally respectfully bid farewell to the demon. In this way the demon is able to freely enter into the space and remain there, or if he so chooses, possess the person executing the invocation.The artist enjoys the liberty not to be present during execution of the instruction.

Demonolatry is the worship of pre-Christian spiritual entities usually referred to as demons, a word derived from the Greek "daimon" meaning divine power. The majority of demons can be traced back to Egyptian, Phoenician, Philistine and Assyrian belief systems and many of the demons are deities that were worshipped in pre-Christian times and whose adoration later was condemned as idolatry. Demonolatry is similar to natural religions in many senses; there are a multitude of different deities and whom you chose to pray to depends on which concerns you wish to address. The demons are not evil per se. As with other pagan beliefs, the deities may choose to grant you your wishes or not depending on how well you have served them, but the Christian division between good and evil is not relevant in Demonolatry.

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